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Don’s journey: My fast-approaching end

In January, Ottawa's Don Kent was diagnosed with terminal cancer. Suddenly faced with his own mortality at 56 years old, Don plans to pursue medical assistance in dying. In this very special blog series, he invites Dying With Dignity Canada supporters to follow along with him on his journey with cancer and his quest for a peaceful death.

This is part six of Don's Journey.

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Don's journey: The night I lost consciousness and ended up back at the hospital

In January, Ottawa's Don Kent was diagnosed with terminal cancer. Suddenly faced with his own mortality at 56 years old, Don plans to pursue medical assistance in dying. In this very special blog series, he invites Dying With Dignity Canada supporters to follow along with him on his journey with cancer and his quest for a peaceful death.

This is part five of Don's Journey.

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Don's journey: The loss of my quality of life

In January, Ottawa's Don Kent was diagnosed with terminal cancer. Suddenly faced with his own mortality at 56 years old, Don plans to pursue medical assistance in dying. In this very special blog series, he invites Dying With Dignity Canada supporters to follow along with him on his journey with cancer and his quest for a peaceful death.

This is part four of Don's Journey.

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Sylvia’s story: How supporting my husband's choice has changed my life

The option of an assisted death can be a source of hope and relief for Canadians who are suffering intolerably as the result of a severe medical condition. But what happens to the loved ones of the people who make that choice? 

When it comes to grief and bereavement, everyone's path is different. However, we can learn a lot from the growing number of Canadians who have supported a family member or friend on a journey with assisted dying. Nova Scotia's Sylvia Henshaw has kindly agreed to share her reflections on the impact that her husband's choice has had on her life. It's a story, she says, that is still being written.

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In Case You Missed It: February 2018

In Case You Missed It is a monthly round-up of news articles and commentaries featuring Dying With Dignity Canada speakers and stories. Did you miss these stories in February?

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Don's journey: What I've learned about assisted dying so far

In January, Ottawa's Don Kent was diagnosed with terminal cancer. Suddenly faced with his own mortality at 56 years old, Don plans to pursue medical assistance in dying. In this very special blog series, he invites Dying With Dignity Canada supporters to follow along with him on his journey with cancer and his quest for a peaceful death.

This is part three of Don's Journey.

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Call for Nominations: DWDC's 2018-2019 Board of Directors

Are you passionate about improving quality in dying for all? Do you want to take on a leading role in shaping Dying With Dignity Canada's human-rights advocacy at one of the most exciting times in the organization's history? Then nominate yourself or someone you know to run as a candidate for one of five vacancies on Dying With Dignity Canada’s Board of Directors. We are accepting nominations until March 30, 2018.

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Don’s journey: My plans to access medical assistance in dying

In January, Ottawa's Don Kent was diagnosed with terminal cancer. Suddenly faced with his own mortality at 56 years old, Don plans to pursue medical assistance in dying. In this very special blog series, he invites Dying With Dignity Canada supporters to follow along with him on his journey with cancer and his quest for a peaceful death.

This is part two of Don's Journey.

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A personal support worker explains why she advocates for end-of-life choice

Lynn Steele has provided intimate care to many clients at end of life. In this blog post, she writes about how the suffering she has seen has inspired her to become a vocal supporter of end-of-life choice, and how the obstacles one client faced when trying to access assisted dying led her to advocate for a person's right to die.

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Rachel’s story: My sister was able to have the gentle, dignified death she wanted

When Rachel Williams' sister, Natalie, was diagnosed with late-stage cancer at the age of 55, she knew she wanted two things: She wanted to stay at home, surrounded by the love and support of her family, and she did not want to needlessly prolong her suffering. Despite resistance from doctors and some family members, Rachel — who has asked that her and her sister's real names not be used to protect their family's privacy — never wavered in her commitment to making sure Natalie was able to access her choice of a medically assisted death.

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